Marshall Scholar will pursue research on algorithms

The senior has more than accomplished the former goal, conducting innovative research on algorithms to reduce network congestion, in the Networks and Mobile Systems group at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL). And, as he graduates this spring with a bachelor’s degree in computer science and electrical engineering and a master’s in engineering, he is well on his way to achieving the latter one.

But Zuo has also taken some productive detours from that roadmap, including minoring in creative writing and helping to launch MakeMIT, the nation’s largest “hardware hackathon.”

The next step in his journey will take him to Cambridge University, where he will continue his computer science research as a Marshall Scholar.

“The Marshall affords me the opportunity to keep exploring for a couple more years on an academic level, and to grow on a personal level, too,” Zuo says. While studying in the Advanced Computer Science program at the university’s Computer Laboratory, “I’ll be able to work with networks and systems to deepen my understanding and take more time to explore this field,” he says.

Algorithms to connect the world

Zuo fell in love with algorithms his first year at MIT. “It was exactly what I was looking for,” he says with a smile. “I took every algorithms course there was on offer.”

His first research experience, the summer after his freshman year, was in the lab of Professor Manolis Kellis, head of the Computational Biology group at CSAIL. Zuo worked with a postdoc in Kellis’ group to use algorithms to identify related clusters of genes in a single cell type within a specific tissue. “We ended up coming up with a pretty cool algorithm,” he says.

As a research assistant for TIBCO Career Development Assistant Professor Mohammad Alizadeh, Zuo is now working on cutting-edge algorithms for congestion control in networks, with a focus on “lossless” data networks.